Sunday, July 29, 2018 (Montreal South KOA, Montreal, Quebec)

This morning was a repeat of yesterday morning...we caught the shuttle at 9:30 into the city. Once at the terminal, we jumped on the double-decker bus, but this time we got off at the first stop...Old Montreal.
The oldest area in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, with some buildings dating back to the era of New France. Located in the borough of Ville-Marie, the area is bordered on the west by McGill St., on the north by Ruelle des Fortifications, on the east by rue Saint-André, and on the south by the Saint Lawrence River. Following recent amendments, the district has been expanded slightly to include the rue des Soeurs Grises in the west, Saint Antoine St. in the north and Saint Hubert Street in the east. It also includes the Old Port of Montreal. Most of Old Montreal was declared a historic district in 1964.

The stop was in front of Parc de La Presse where we were met by this interesting sculpture display.
Parc de La Presse was redesigned by Ville-Marie to accommodate Elisabeth Buffoli's sculpture. The sculpture was a gift from Paris to Montréal for Montréal's 375th anniversary. The park, which is located at the corner of Rue Saint-Antoine Ouest and Côte de la Place d’Armes, evokes both the first French settlers in Montréal and the modernity and continuity of this relationship between the French-speaking metropolis of America and the French-speaking metropolis of Europe.
We started up the hill to Notre-Dame Basilica of Montreal, a couple of blocks away. Once there we inquired about tours inside but since it was Sunday, it would not be open for tours until 1:00...okay, we'll be back.
Other end of the Notre-Dame Basilica...
Kitty- corner from the Notre-Dame Basilica...
Maisonneuve Monument on Place d'Armes...This monument in memory of Paul Chomedey de Maisonneuve, founder of Montreal, was unveiled on July 1, 1895, as part of the celebrations for the 250th anniversary of the founding of the city in 1892. In 1896, the imposing monument in the centre of Place d'Armes attracted many curious onlookers.
Place d'Armes taken from in front of Notre-Dame...
Buildings kitty-corner from Notre-Dame...
 Walking along Notre-Dame Street....

I think this is the Quebec Court of Appeal, Montreal...

Vauquelin Square...
Looking towards Nelson's Column...
Nelson's Column...is a monument erected in 1809 in Place Jacques-Cartier, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, which is dedicated to the memory of Admiral Horatio Nelson, following his death at the Battle of Trafalgar. Subsequent to the destruction of Nelson's Pillar in Dublin (1808–1966), Montreal's pillar now stands as the second-oldest "Nelson's Column" in the world, after the Nelson Monument in Glasgow. It is also the city's oldest monument and is the oldest war monument in Canada.






Archives de Montréal...
Chateau Ramezay, Historic Site and Museum...
Montréal’s portal to its past, the Château Ramezay was built in the 18th century as a prestigious residence. It was the first building in Québec to be classified an historic monument.

Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel at the end of the street...


Lots of construction in this area...would imagined water and sewer lines would be very old...





Bonsecours Market (French: Marché Bonsecours), at 350 rue Saint-Paul in Old Montreal, is a two-story domed public market. For more than 100 years, it was the main public market in the Montreal area. It also briefly accommodated the Parliament of United Canada for one session in 1849. Named for the adjacent Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel, it opened in 1847. During 1849 the building was used for the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada. The market's design was influenced by Dublin's Customs House.

We didn't explore the waterfront....Ferris Wheel and Zip Line from the tower to the sailing ship...


Place Jacques-Cartier...Nelson Column...





Many of the streets really reminded us of streets in Paris...



This monument was all in French so don't know what it's about...

Entrance to courtyard...






Henri Bourassa was a French Canadian political leader and publisher. In 1899, Bourassa was outspoken against the British government's request for Canada to send a militia to fight for Britain in the Second Boer War. Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier's compromise was to send a volunteer force, but the seeds were sown for future conscription protests during the World Wars of the next half-century. Bourassa challenged, unsuccessfully, the proposal to build warships to help protect the empire. He led the opposition to mandatory conscription during World War I, arguing that Canada's interests were not at stake.

Henri Bourassa home...
Too many people!
After dodging the crowds and walking and walking...and walking some more, it was time to sit down for lunch. We chose 3 Brasseurs  (Brewers). We started to sit outside on the patio but with no shade, it was unbearably hot...
...so we asked to move inside...
Belly's full it's time to explore some more...

We headed back to Notre-Dame Basilica. It was shortly after 1:00 and there was a huge line up...well, that sucks! Guess we won't be seeing inside...drats!
So we continued walking...Chinatown...the place was packed and not very interesting at all...




By this point, we had pretty well decided that we would walk back to the terminal rather than "hop on" the bus and go along the whole tour route again. Besides, it was doubtful that we would be back in time for our 6:30 shuttle back to the KOA.

We had heard that Montreal has an underground city, so we thought we'd try to find out more about it and perhaps make our way back underground. We found this tourism kiosk (red cart and umbrella) where the nice young lady told us about it.
RÉSO, commonly referred to as The Underground City, is the name applied to a series of interconnected office towers, hotels, shopping centres, residential and commercial complexes, convention halls, universities and performing arts venues that form the heart of Montreal's central business district, colloquially referred to as Downtown Montreal. The name refers to the underground connections between the buildings that compose the network, in addition to the network's complete integration with the city's entirely underground rapid transit system, the Montreal Metro. The network is particularly useful during Montreal's long winters, during which time well over half a million people are estimated to use it every day. The network is largely climate controlled and well-lit, and is arranged in a U-shape with two principal north–south axes connected by an east–west axis. Combined, there are 32 kilometres' worth of tunnels over twelve square kilometres of the most densely populated part of Montreal.

With  some direction from her, we headed off. We found it very confusing...probably because all signs are in french. But we finally found the entrance. I guess because it is Sunday, the tunnels were empty...it was very eerie. Also we think the interesting part of the underground city is on the other side of town and we didn't have time to explore further...
Totally confused as to where to go next, we decided to just walk back above ground. We left the tunnels at Victoria Square. Queen Victoria Statue...


Pillar Art I guess...
The modern mixed with the old...



Above and below...Banque Nationale



Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral...
Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral (French: Cathédrale Marie-Reine-du-Monde) is a minor basilica in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and the seat of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of Montreal. It is the third largest church in Quebec after Saint Joseph's Oratory (also in Montreal) and the Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré east of Quebec City. The building is 101 m (333 ft) in length, 46 m (150 ft) in width, and a maximum height of 77 m (252 ft) at the cupola, the diameter of which is 23 m (75 ft).
Dorchester Square...




Robert Burns Memorial...
It was just after 5:00 and we were close to the shuttle pick up spot, so we decided to go to the pub and have a beer while we wait. OMG...that was a lot of walking! I believe it was over 17,000 steps according to my FitBit.

Needless to say we were happy to get on the shuttle and head home...we were exhausted!


6 comments:

  1. You guys are wearing me out! ;-)

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  2. Looking at your pictures is like looking at ours and we also stopped at the same pub for a lunch break and a beer, so cool. Glad you enjoyed, we are now in Quebec city for a week. Cheers.

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    1. Montréal was great but Quebec City was fabulous! Safe travels and enjoy.

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  3. Wow ... way too much walking for Ray and I. Thanks for the tour though. Love the old architecture.

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    1. They sure don’t build them like they used too!

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